Jonathan Moyo says people are tired of MDC lies and hallucinations


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Information Minister Jonathan Moyo spoiled the conciliatory tone of President Robert Mugabe when he opened Parliament on 22 July 2003, easing tensions between the Zimbabwe African National Union- Patriotic Front and the Movement for Democratic Change, by labelling the MDC a “hitherto treasonous party” which must stop “sabotaging the economy” and claiming that the public was “tired of MDC lies and hallucinations”.

A cable by United States ambassador Zimbabwe Joseph Sullivan said: “Even the usually acid-tongued ZANU-PF International Secretary Didymus Mutasa said that it would be important for the two parties to work together to find an economic way forward.”

 

Full cable:

 

Viewing cable 03HARARE1507, HOW MUCH GIVE IN ZANU-PF OPENNESS TO DIALOGUE

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Reference ID

Created

Released

Classification

Origin

03HARARE1507

2003-07-25 09:34

2011-08-30 01:44

CONFIDENTIAL

Embassy Harare

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

 

250934Z Jul 03

C O N F I D E N T I A L HARARE 001507

 

SIPDIS

 

STATE FOR AF/FO AND AF/S

NSC FOR SR AFRICA ADVISER JENDAYII FRAZER

 

E.O. 12958: DECL: 07/25/2008

TAGS: PGOV PREL ZI

SUBJECT: HOW MUCH GIVE IN ZANU-PF OPENNESS TO DIALOGUE

 

REF: A. (A) HARARE 1475

 

B. (B) HARARE 1491

C. (C) HARARE 1506

 

Classified By: JOSEPH G. SULLIVAN FOR REASON 1.5D

 

1.(C) Most Zimbabweans appear to have welcomed the signs of

openness to dialogue reflected in the MDC’s attendance at

President Mugabe’s July 22 speech to parliament (ref A). MDC

spokesmen have remained on message about their hopes that the

gesture would open the way for serious dialogue between the

parties to address the national crisis, despite the July 22

arrest (for several hours) of MDC spokesman Paul Themba-Nyati

over an MDC caricature of President Mugabe and despite

impediments posed to registration of some MDC local

government candidates(ref B). President Mugabe’s speech to

the Parliament(ref C) was relatively restrained, but highly

unrealistic. Then at a later luncheon speech that day to some

parliamentarians and others, Mugabe was somewhat more

explicit about his pleasure that MDC had attended the

parliamentary session and his hope that ZANU-PF and MDC would

work together in parliament.

 

2.(U) The state media net also went into overdrive, lauding

the signs of national reconciliation. Even the usually

acid-tongued ZANU-PF International Secretary Didymus Mutasa

said that it would be important for the two parties to work

together to find an economic way forward. He did not object

to the MDC maintaining its lawsuit against the conduct of the

2002 presidential election, but he called for the MDC to

secure “from its handlers” the removal of economic sanctions

against Zimbabwe” and rejected the MDC’s statement that they

would seek an honorable exit for President Mugabe. State

media on July 24 picked up the theme that the MDC must

demonstrate its patriotism by securing an end to sanctions

against Zimbabwe, while Information Minister Jonathan Moyo

diverted from the mostly conciliatory tone by labeling the

MDC a “hitherto treasonous party” which must stop “sabotaging

the economy” and claiming that the public is “tired of MDC

lies and hallucinations.”

 

3.(C) Comment: It is too early to tell with what sincerity

ZANU-PF is approaching the putative reconciliation with MDC.

As a minimum, ZANU-PF wished to secure MDC’s attendance in

parliament to provide the show of honor which means so much

to Mugabe. The Mugabe Government also wished to alleviate

some of the pressure it was under from South Africa and

others to enter into dialogue with the MDC. ZANU would also

like MDC to share the responsibility for the economic

hardships the populace is facing and, ideally, to use their

international ties to relieve the pressure on Zimbabwe. At

this point, we are dubious that ZANU intends to give the MDC

a genuine share of power or to enter into the sort of

dialogue which addresses the serious issues of Mugabe’s

legitimacy and seeks a consensus formula for addressing the

issue. This tentative judgment could change depending on the

amount of external pressure Mugabe comes under, particularly

from President Mbeki who has been lionized of late in the

state media for his advocacy of “African solutions to African

problems” and alleged resistance to American and British

impositions. The rapidly unraveling economic situation will

also put additional pressures on the GOZ, next when

Zimbabweans are unable to access the salary deposits made in

their bank accounts at the end of the month. (Bankers told

us yesterday told us they feared that riots could break out

when the currency shortage hits even harder with the

increased and unmeetable demand for cash from account holders

after end-month salary deposits.)

SULLIVAN

(17 VIEWS)

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The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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