Who will be the leader of the opposition: Chamisa, Khumalo or Mudzuri?


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President Emmerson Mnangagwa says under his administration the leader of the opposition is going to be recognized and will be given perks in Parliament.

He told Bloomberg Television in New York on Friday: “Under our Commonwealth parliamentary democracy, the opposition is recognised, you recognise the leader of the opposition in Parliament.

“Under the former administration, there was no formal recognition of the opposition leader, but now under my administration, we are embracing the Commonwealth approach to parliamentary democracy, where you recognise the leader of the opposition and he is given certain recognition and perks in Parliament.”

Mnangagwa’s new move raises a number of questions.

Who is going to be recognized as the leader of the opposition “in Parliament”?

The leader of the main opposition Nelson Chamisa is not a Member of Parliament.

Zimbabwe’s Parliament has two arms, the National Assembly and the Senate, though the National Assembly is usually referred to as the Parliament.

The Movement for Democratic Change leader of the opposition in the National Assembly, or Parliament as it is often referred to is, party national chair Thabitha Khumalo.

The leader of the opposition in the Senate is party vice-president Elias Mudzuri.

So who of these three is the official leader of the opposition?

Or is someone from the MDC going to step down to allow Chamisa get into Parliament?

If Chamisa steps down to become a legislator can be continue to claim he won the presidency?

What are your views about this?

(286 VIEWS)

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The Insider

The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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