Mnangagwa tells Chamisa to get onto the train or he will be left behind


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President Emmerson Mnangagwa today told opposition leader Nelson Chamisa to get onto the train otherwise he will be left behind.

Addressing people gathered at Heroes’ Acre to bid farewell to Emilio Munemo, a liberation fighter who died this week and was declared a national hero, Mnangagwa said:  “Those who want to get on the bus are welcome on board, and those not interested can stay behind. Zimbabwe is a train on the move.”

Mnangagwa has called for national dialogue to allow the country to move forward but Chamisa has refused to join talks convened by Mnangagwa arguing that Mnangagwa is one of the disputants and can therefore not convene the talks.

Chamisa prefers an international mediator but United Nations coordinator in Zimbabwe Bishow Parajuli said the international body preferred dialogue that was nationally led and locally owned.

“We would like to see this consensus building process to dialogue being nationally led and locally owned. Experiences worldwide and indeed in Zimbabwe show that sustainable peace has a higher chance of lasting when it is nationally led and locally owned and everyone committed,” he told church leaders last month.

Chamisa has set five conditions for dialogue and argues that any dialogue that does not include him will not resolve the country’s problems.

Mnangagwa, however, said the dialogue that he is currently having both locally and internally cannot be derailed.

“We cannot be derailed, we cannot be stopped. Let us march forward, backward never. Victory is certain, our prosperity is inevitable,” he said.

(911 VIEWS)

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The Insider

The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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