Majority of Zimbabweans want status quo- survey


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The majority of Zimbabweans said they registered to vote because they want to retain the status quo, which means they want the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front to stay in power, a recent survey has shown.

The survey by the Leaders for Africa Network, conducted from 7 June to 2 July, indicated that 49 percent of those polled wanted the status quo to remain.

Twenty-three percent wanted change while 10 percent just registered to vote because everyone was doing it. Eight percent did not know why they were registering to vote.

The survey involved 2 500 people 741 of whom were from rural areas, 813 from semi-rural areas and 941 from urban areas.

While there are more women than men and generally more female voters than male ones, the sample had an equal number of male and female voters.

Zimbabwe is holding its crucial elections in 11 days but the main opposition, Movement for Democratic Change Alliance led by Nelson Chamisa has appealed to the Southern African Development Community to put pressure on the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission to institute two key reforms on the voters roll and the printing of the ballot papers.

Parliamentary watchdog, Veritas Zimbabwe, says the presidential ballot paper, which has 23 candidates was manipulated to favour ZANU-PF leader Emmerson Mnangagwa.

Chamisa says he is not boycotting the elections because “we are the elections” but at the same time he argues that he will not be frog-marched into a farce.

He said his supporters will start a vigil on the EC from Tuesday next week, six days to the poll.

WHAT LED YOUR DECISION TO REGISTER TO VOTE?

(106 VIEWS)

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The Insider

The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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