High Court nullifies 2% tax


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The High Court has set aside the 2 percent tax on all electronic transactions introduced by Finance Minister Mthuli Ncube to raise revenue for the cash strapped Zimbabwean government, according to a tweet from the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights.

Details are still sketchy but the tweet said the case was argued by Movement for Democratic Change vice-president Tendai Biti.

The tax, which was highly unpopular, was a cash-cow for the government and was being used on various development projects including welfare projects.

The victory will be a major boost for Biti whose political star has been rising since he was elected one of the three MDC vice-presidents.

Twitter followers have already started showering praise on Biti with William Zambezi saying: “Chibaba Biti did it again for the Nation.”

Rodney Jere said: “Leadership is fighting on the same side with the common man and woman on the street and not siding with the gangsters. Big up Tendai Biti.”

Privilege Makuvire, however, said “the big question is will the government/ZanuPF abide to this ruling.”

Mboe Mdonga-Masuku did not think so.

“A corrupt gvt that has broken the constitution time and again will not listen to this.. they need money or else their bellies will shrink  they are coming for our money one way or the other.. mr gvt we know you,” he tweeted.

The government has not yet commended on the judgment but Zimbabwe is currently trying to spruce up its international image ad had been badly bruised by the recent abductions of activists and would therefore like to be seen to be doing the right thing- abiding by the rule of law.

 

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The Insider

The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

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