Chamisa tells EU observer team he has presented 10 demands for free and fair elections to Mnangagwa


0

Movement for Democratic Change Alliance leader Nelson Chamisa today told the European Union observer team that he has presented 10 demands for free and fair elections to President Emmerson Mnangagwa.

He said the demands were enshrined in the Alliance’s Plan and Environment and Credible Election (PEACE) which he said will be launched today.

Some of the demands are:

·        the role of the military in the coming elections

·        the independence of the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission 40 percent of whose secretariat are either serving or retired members of the military, the

·        the impartiality and free and equal coverage of all contesting parties by the public broadcaster, and

·        legislative reforms covering the Electoral Act, the Public Order and Security Act as well as the Access to Information and Privacy  Act, which he said proscribed fundamental freedoms of speech and assembly.

Chamisa also said there was need for all contesting parties to audit the voters roll and to stem violence and intimidation so that the sovereign expression of the people is not curtailed.

Mnangagwa has promised free and fair elections in July and says the elections will be open to international observers.

Already a Southern African Development Community team, an African Union team and a United Nations team have already been to the country to assess the situation.

Mnangagwa says there is no need for violence and wants credible elections to gain legitimacy.

Chamisa has dismissed Mnangagwa as a contestant because he is yesterday’s man.

Continued next page

(836 VIEWS)

Don't be shellfish... Please SHAREShare on Google+
Google+
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on Facebook
Facebook
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
Email this to someone
email
Print this page
Print

Like it? Share with your friends!

0
The Insider

The Insider is a political and business bulletin about Zimbabwe, edited by Charles Rukuni. Founded in 1990, it was a printed 12-page subscription only newsletter until 2003 when Zimbabwe's hyper-inflation made it impossible to continue printing.

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *